Car Accident


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Post Collision Fuel-Fed Fires and Burn Injuries

PCFFF (post collision fuel-fed fire) is a common acronym used within the personal injury law community. It stands for “post collision fuel-fed fire.” The US Fire Administration cites post collision fuel-fed fires as the number one cause of car deaths. Car fires can happen for a multitude of reasons, ranging from manufacturing defects like the improper placement of a fuel tank to problems with transmission fluids. The majority of car fires are not fatal – unless there is a burn injury involved. Since most fire injuries occur because of manufacturing issues and are not the victim’s fault, personal injury victims are entitled to hold the manufacturers of motor vehicles accountable. Wilshire Law Firm can get you the financial compensation you deserve! How Common Are Car Accident Fires? Car accident fires are relatively rare. However, the impact of severe burns to an injury victim can be scarring in more ways than one. Those with medical bills from any smoke inhalation that occurred, chemical burns, or any other injuries from their accident may be entitled to compensation for the damages they have suffered. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, there were a total of 212,500 vehicle fires in 2019. Of those 212,500 vehicle fires, 49% were caused by mechanical malfunctions! Only a small 3% were caused by the crash itself. That is why it is so important to recognize and be aware of the potential causes of a car fire accident – to prevent injuries and fatalities. Causes of Car Crash Fires Several components can lead to a car fire accident, and it is incredibly important that drivers are aware of these factors so that they can do their part in preventing a car accident fire. Very rarely is the cause of the fire the actual crash! The top four causes of car accident fires are: Mechanical Malfunctions Spilled Fluids Electrical Failures Car Crash or Rollover Accident Levels of Burn Injuries A burn is medically defined as damage to the skin caused by extreme heat, flame, contact with chemicals, or hot surfaces. There are several “levels” of serious burn injury, categorized from least severe to most severe. First degree burns These affect the epidermis (the outer layer of the skin). The burn site is colored red and may be painful and blistered. There is a very small likelihood of any long-term damage. These types of burns can usually be treated with easy over-the-counter healing treatment. Second degree burns (“partial thickness burns”) This occurs when the burn affects both the epidermis and the lower layer of skin, the dermis. The burn is generally extremely painful, blistered, and has white and red splotches. Third degree burns (“full-thickness burns”) A burn is considered to be a third degree burn when it not only completely burns the epidermis and dermis, but also burns the innermost layer of skin. This type of burn is considered to be very severe and the burn site is likely to appear blackened or completely white and may result in permanent scarring. Fourth degree burns This is considered the most dangerous level of a severe burn. This type of burn means every single layer of skin is damaged, as well as the bones and muscles underneath. Due to severe nerve damage, there is likely to be almost no pain associated with the immediate aftermath of this burn. You would likely need to get some form of skin graft if you experienced this level of burn. Burn injuries that lead to personal injury lawsuits often result in scarring and/or disfigurement to the burn victim. This type of injury is far from being just a simple surface wound and can even permanently change a victim’s life. Can I File a Fire Injury Lawsuit? Yes. If you believe that your burn injury is even partially due to another party’s negligence, you may be entitled to compensation. Depending on the degree of injury suffered by the affected party and the cost of future medical treatment, the value of each case may fluctuate. To determine the value of your personal injury case, we will need to examine the extent of injuries received, as well as future medical expenses. Most law firms do not have the extensive experience and knowledge necessary to get you the compensation you deserve and maximize the value of your claim. With special legal cases like car accident burn injuries, you need an injury lawyer you can trust. Contact Wilshire Law Firm immediately for an absolutely free case evaluation with no obligation. We will give you our opinion as to the value and liability. Who is Held Accountable? Identifying defendants in a burn injury compensation lawsuit might not be obvious. Your injury lawyer can review your case and determine who should be held at fault or otherwise be found negligent for your injuries. In most cases, there can be both direct and indirect liability in your case. There are likely multiple separate defendants in your case; ranging from property owners to the electrical company. That is exactly why it is so essential to talk to an injury lawyer as soon as possible after experiencing a serious injury in a burn accident. Consulting an Attorney If you are an accident victim, you have the right to seek complete justice for the pain and suffering you have experienced. It is important that you take action right away if you believe that you may be entitled to financial compensation. In California, the statute of limitations gives an individual with a personal injury case two years from the date of the injury to go to court and file a lawsuit. Don’t wait; call Wilshire Law Firm today! Our trial attorneys are known for their fearless advocacy and willingness to fight for our clients and their unique situations. We have a reputation for obtaining maximum value for our personal injury lawsuits and making sure that our clients get the justice they deserve. Wilshire Law Firm is a premier personal injury law firm with extensive experience fighting big manufacturing and insurance companies to get our clients the maximum compensation for their car fire injury. Our law firm will hold people and institutions accountable for the injuries they have caused. We can all help make our communities safer when we pursue the justice we deserve. Contact one of our personal injury attorneys today for a FREE case consultation! Call +1-800-522-7274.

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Driving During an Earthquake? DON'T Do This

Credit: National Park Service (NPS) Photo Since the magnitude 6.7 Northridge earthquake in 1994, Los Angeles and Southern California have been lucky to avoid other major significant seismic activity. But that period of relative quiet ended with some fireworks on the Fourth of July in 2019 when a magnitude 6.4 quake in Ridgecrest, California, rocking communities from Las Vegas to Baja California, followed by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake in the same area the next day, as well as numerous aftershocks. Because you never know when another big one is going to strike, it’s important to always be prepared, and that includes knowing what to do if you’re on the road when an earthquake hits. What NOT to Do When Driving During an Earthquake Most Californians know to drop, cover, and hold during an earthquake, but those rules go out the window if you’re driving when the quake occurs. Before the ground starts shaking and you’re left unsure of what to do, below are a few tips of what not to do in an earthquake while driving. Do NOT… Brake Suddenly: When you stop suddenly, you risk surprising other motorists and causing accidents. Sudden braking can lead to a rear-end collision and multi-vehicle pileup. Try to Out-Drive the Quake: Although it might be tempting to try this, you’re not going to be able to out-drive the earthquake. P Waves can travel up to 14 kilometers per second, which is significantly faster than whatever vehicle you happen to be driving. Get Out and Run: Do not get out of your vehicle and start running, either. Not only are you unlikely to escape the radius of a major earthquake, but large cracks, strong shaking, and fallen power lines, debris, glass, gas leaks, etc. are a recipe for disaster when you’re on foot. When you are in the car, you should avoid leaving it unless remaining in the car puts you at immediate risk.  Drive Under or Over a Bridge: Bridges are at high risk for earthquake damage, especially during large earthquakes. You should avoid them if at all possible, including immediately after the quake. It is best to avoid driving over bridges if you notice shaking. Use Your Phone Unless Necessary: Avoid using your phone unless absolutely necessary, such as if you need to call 911 because you’re injured. It is important to keep lines clear so that emergency calls can go through and emergency personnel can communicate. Only use your phone if absolutely necessary.  How to Avoid an Accident During an Earthquake The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services have partnered together to create a list of recommended protective actions that will reduce injury and damage in the event of an earthquake. If you’re hoping to avoid a car accident or motorcycle accident during an earthquake, you should do the following.  DO… Reduce Speed Gradually: During an earthquake, reduce your speed gradually to avoid surprising other motorists and getting into a rear-end accident or multi-vehicle pileup. Pull Over: Pull over to the side of the road away from bridges, overpasses, power lines, and other hazards. If there is no clear space to pull over, keep driving until you find one. Park: Set your parking brake, turn your vehicle off, and leave on your seatbelt. Your car is a safe place to be during an earthquake, as long as it is not in the path of anything that could be dangerous, like a bridge, power line, or pillar.  Turn on the Radio: During an earthquake, instructions from the government or local authorities are broadcast over the radio. Leaving your radio on is the best way to stay informed of the situation and avoid the risk of further danger. Wait: Occupants of a vehicle should remain in the car until the shaking stops. Only leave your car if staying in the vehicle poses an immediate safety hazard. Stock your car with emergency supplies or an earthquake survival kit to be on the safe side. Once the shaking has subsided, proceed carefully. In the wake of the Ridgecrest quake, and with the Big One still sure to hit California someday, planning for an earthquake has never been more important than it is now. For more information about earthquake safety and help with emergency planning, review FEMA’s Earthquake Safety Checklist. Additional Precautions to Take After the Quake Even once the strong earthquake has passed, it is important to act with caution. An earthquake can damage the integrity of buildings, roadways, and services. Once the shaking stops and it’s safe to drive again, you should proceed with caution.  Drivers should make sure to avoid driving under or over bridges, near downed power lines, on highway ramps, or other structures that may have sustained damage during the quake.  You should also be aware that earthquakes might have aftershocks. These can be dangerous. If you notice further shaking or tremors, it is best to pull over again.  The biggest danger during an earthquake is not the quake itself but the environment where you are when the earthquake happens. More often than not, accidents and injuries during an earthquake result from damage to a nearby man-made structure or building. The highest death tolls from earthquakes in history, going as far back as 1556 and as recently as the 21st Century, are due to improper building conditions. Computer analysis suggests that an 8.0 earthquake in Los Angeles would cause about 10,000 more deaths during the day than it would at night because the population would be on freeways and in large buildings.  While structures are a huge factor, injuries can also occur from accidents involving other drivers on the road, which could be caused by the shaking itself or by those drivers not taking the correct precautions for road saftey during and after an earthquake. Wilshire Law Firm: Experienced Car Accident Lawyers As experienced car accident lawyers, we do whatever we can to promote road safety, which is why we’re bringing you these helpful tips. While no one can know when an earthquake is going to strike while they’re driving, there are many types of avoidable motor vehicle accidents, including car accidents, motorcycle accidents, truck accidents, pedestrian accidents, and more that are caused by another person’s negligence (i.e., traffic violations, drunk driving, distracted driving, etc.). When these accidents occur, our injury attorneys are here to help. Recovering more than $850,000,000 in compensation on behalf of our clients, we’re committed to helping injury victims get the best results possible in their cases. To find out how we can assist you, call us today at (800) 522-7274 or fill out our online form for a free consultation.

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Rental Car Insurance: Everything You Need to Know

A car accident may be the furthest thing from your mind when you’re researching rental cars. But the rental car agent will most certainly bring it up when you pick up your vehicle. That’s because they’ll offer you additional insurance coverage. Do you know what coverage to accept and what to turn down? It’s so important to research and find out what your own insurance and credit card cover way before you reach the rental car counter. Otherwise, if you do get into a car accident with your rental, you could be looking at some major problems. Keep in mind, this information applies only to passenger vehicles rented in the United States from traditional car rental companies. If you are renting a car for business purposes, odds are that your personal auto insurance will not cover your rental. First, let’s look at the five most common rental car company coverage choices: Loss/Collision Damage Waiver – The rental car company won’t charge you if the vehicle is damaged or stolen. This also covers what’s deemed “loss of use charges” if the car has to go into a shop to be repaired, causing it to be out of the rental car company’s fleet for any period of time. Liability Coverage – Protects you if you injure someone or damage property due to a car accident. Personal Accident Insurance – Covers medical bills for the driver and any passengers in the rental vehicle. Sometimes ambulance expenses are covered as well. Personal Effects Coverage – Coverage for personal belongings stolen or damaged while in the rental. Roadside Assistance – Most rental car companies offer roadside assistance– at a fee. This protects you from additional charges for problems that may arise, such as running out of gas, lost keys or a dead battery. Note, flat tire services are not always covered or may only be offered separately, adding on yet another fee. Rental car agents often employ scare tactics when they offer you additional insurance coverage. That’s because they’re not service employees, they’re salespeople. You might be surprised to learn that they make commissions on every extra they can tack onto to your rental car bill, hence the hard sell. It’s so important to research and find out what your own insurance and credit card cover way before you reach the rental car counter. Are any of the car rental company’s added coverages worth buying? A lot will depend on your individual circumstances. You certainly don’t want to waste money and pay for the same coverage twice, but you don’t want to be on the hook for thousands of dollars in bills either. There are some situations where the choice is more obvious. YES: You currently don’t have car insurance – You must have some sort of insurance before you get behind the wheel. If you have homeowner’s, renter’s or health insurance, check to see if and what rental car coverage they offer. If they don’t cover your rental, check with your credit card company. If they only offer secondary coverage, which is more common, you’ll need to take at least part of the rental car company’s coverage. See below for an explanation of what your credit card will cover. You’re not confident behind the wheel or driving in a new city – If you’re nervous about driving in a new city and/or a new, unfamiliar vehicle, you may want to add their collision coverage for added peace of mind. MAYBE: Your own auto insurance policy has a high deductible and/or minimum liability coverage – If you only carry your state’s minimum in coverage and you’re involved in a major accident, your policy may not cover all of the damages. You’ll have to pay the difference. That can run into the tens of thousands of dollars. You may also have to pay a large deductible. You have homeowner’s or renter’s insurance that covers your personal belongings –Some consumers want to avoid filing a claim through their own insurance because they’re afraid their premiums will go up. If that’s your situation, go ahead and add personal effects coverage. It’s one of the lower priced add-ons so it doesn’t add much to your rental car bill anyway. Of course, check to see how much the daily charges add up to before you do. NO: You are covered by your own personal auto insurance – Consumers who are fully covered and have high liability limits on their personal insurance policies can usually decline any extra coverage from the car rental company. Your health insurance company offers personal accident insurance – You can probably decline this coverage. Check with your health insurance provider to make sure. Some rental car companies also offer wrongful death coverage. If you have life insurance, you may already have coverage. Some health insurance companies offer it as well. Check to see if that’s the case. You already have roadside assistance – If you have roadside assistance, either through an organization, your insurance or your credit card, you can waive this coverage. Double check with them to make sure they cover rental vehicles. For consumers who haven’t rented a car in a while, note that the days of free roadside assistance are pretty much gone. The majority of rental car companies now charge for the service and that can really add to your final bill. Won’t my credit card cover car rental insurance? That depends. First some requirements. In order to have any insurance coverage through your credit card, you must: Use that card to book your vehicle. The person behind the wheel at the time of the accident must match the name on the credit card used to book the reservation. You must decline collision coverage from the rental car company when you pick up your vehicle. If you can tick off all three of these, then it depends on whether your credit card offers primary or secondary coverage. Primary Coverage – If you have primary coverage, you’re covered in an accident. In fact, your auto insurance company will not be involved at all. The problem is that not too many credit cards offer primary coverage. Secondary Coverage – Most credit cards only offer secondary coverage. That means your personal auto insurance pays out on the claim first. It only kicks in after your own coverage has been exhausted. An example would be to reimburse you for any deductible paid. What can I do to avoid any surprises at the end of my rental? Inspect the vehicle at pick up – One of the most important things you can do at pick up is to inspect the car thoroughly with the agent present. Take your time doing this. Don’t be afraid to point out anything that looks like a scratch or a dent. Videotape or take photos as you inspect it. Don’t forget the interior as well. Sit inside the car. Lower and raise the windows and make sure everything else is in working order. Rushing things may cause you to overlook a scratch or dent. That can end up costing you hundreds of dollars when you return the car. Inspect it again when you drop it off – When you bring it back, videotape or photograph the vehicle again, especially if no rental agent is present. Ask questions – Don’t be shy. Ask questions regarding the actual rental paperwork. If there’s a fee you don’t understand, ask what it’s for. There are cheaper car rental insurance options out there. Through online booking services – If you rented your car through an online travel service, you can purchase additional coverage directly through their site. Most offer the same rental car insurance for considerably less than what the rental car companies charge. You need to add it at the time of booking. Third party car rental insurance providers – Another lower priced choice is car rental insurance through a third-party provider. Again, you’ll have to plan in advance. These policies are offered by several established insurance companies at up to 1/3 less than what the rental car companies are charging. What happens if I do get into an accident with my rental car? Getting into an accident with a rental car is a little more complicated than with your own car. There’s a third party involved: the car rental company. Here’s how they’re likely to proceed. The rental car company doesn’t really care who’s at fault. When you rent a vehicle, you promise to return it in the exact same condition it was in when you were handed the keys, whether you caused the accident or not. That is clearly spelled out in the paperwork you sign on the day that you pick up the vehicle. The state of their vehicle is their main concern. The rental car company will tap your insurance even if you didn’t cause the accident. The rental car company will want their vehicle back in circulation as soon as possible. They will go through the insurance you used when you booked your reservation to make sure they’re covered, whether you are at fault for the accident or not. As for any deductible, generally, you’ll have to pay that directly to the rental car company. Again, it doesn’t matter if you were at fault for the accident or not. They may charge a “loss of use” fee for each day the rental vehicle is in the shop being repaired. Depending on your insurance coverage, you could potentially be billed for rental charges while the vehicle is being repaired. This is called ‘loss of use”. If it takes a week to get the car fixed and back into the rental car company’s fleet, you might be on the hook for an additional week’s rent. If you have loss of use coverage, but the time the vehicle is in the shop exceeds the limits of your coverage, you’ll be billed for the difference. All that aside, you should consider contesting this controversial fee. Many consumers have successfully challenged it through their insurance companies. What about the other driver and you? If you are at fault – If you have complete personal coverage, your insurance will cover all expenses. However, your insurance rates could go up as well. If you are at fault but don’t have sufficient coverage, you will be liable for any property and personal damages due to the accident. The other party may also come after you for medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering. If you are not at fault – If you’re injured in a car accident, you should pursue legal action against the at-fault party to recoup any damages, deductibles, medical bills and lost wages incurred. It’s important to call a personal injury attorney as soon as possible after the accident. A good personal injury attorney will have experience dealing with accidents involving rental cars. You have the facts, now the final decision is yours. Deciding what coverage to accept and turn down is a highly personal one. For some, a $1,000 deductible is not a big deal, for others it absolutely is. Then there’s the question of how much liability you want to expose yourself to. That all depends on what you’re comfortable with. You might be the type of person who wants a stress-free rental and doesn’t mind spending extra for that. Or you may be willing to take a chance to save some money. The bottom line is: Know what your personal insurance and credit card cover before you reach the rental car counter. Hopefully, you’ll have an incident-free rental. But if you are injured in a car accident and were not at fault, you’ll want an experienced car accident attorney by your side. At Wilshire Law Firm we know the complexities that accidents involving a rental car can present. Our attorneys will fight to make sure you obtain a fair and just settlement. We have your best interests at heart and are ready to assist you every step of the way. Contact us today at 1-800-522-7274. For further reading and information, visit: DMV: When to buy rental car insurance Consumer Affairs: Car rental insurance tip sheet Department of Insurance: Things to know about car insurance and rental cars before starting your road trip

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Where Do Car Accidents Happen Most?

Car accidents are, by nature, unpredictable. There is no exact science to forecasting or preventing them. However, there are evident patterns in when and where crashes occur – and knowing these patterns can help reduce the risk of an incident. In this article, we cover a few common accident scenarios and what you can do in these situations to avoid becoming a statistic. Neighborhoods It may sound surprising, but the majority of car accidents happen close to home. In fact, a Progressive Insurance study from 2004 found that approximately 52% of all accidents occur within just five miles from a person’s home. Generally, we’re more likely to crash in our own neighborhoods than anywhere else. This can be explained by our brain’s propensity for going on autopilot when we’re driving familiar routes. If you’ve ever arrived at a destination only to realize that you were in a trance-like state the entire drive, then you know this phenomenon. When we drive in familiar places, we tend to rely more on muscle memory than on our vigilance and active driving skills (dulling our ability to react to unexpected occurrences). The two most important things you can and should do every time you drive is buckling up and stay alert. As long as you keep your mental faculties fully active, you will be a better, safer driver on the road. Parking Lots When you combine lots of cars in a compact space with stressed-out drivers all vying for limited parking spaces, you get a hotbed for accidents. Parking lots are arguably the place where most low-speed collisions occur. Common parking lot accidents include vehicles backing up into each other, vehicles backing up and getting clipped by passing vehicles, vehicles sideswiping other vehicles as they park, etc. While accidents at these sites very rarely result in significant injuries, the vehicle damages that often result can be expensive to repair. Daily Commutes In large sprawling metropolitan cities like Los Angeles, commuters spend hours each day stuck in traffic. Many commuters multitask behind the wheel, putting on makeup, fiddling with the radio, eating food, shaving, and even brushing their teeth. Additionally, people may feel physically exhausted or mentally frazzled from getting up early or from having a hard day at work. When you take all of these factors into consideration, it’s not hard to see why many crashes occur during rush hour. What should you do if you’ve been injured in a car accident? If you or a loved one has been injured in a car accident caused by another party, please don’t hesitate to contact the experienced car accident lawyers at Wilshire Law Firm for immediate legal assistance. We can help you get compensation for your medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and more. For a FREE comprehensive case evaluation, call us today at 1-800-52-CRASH.

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Dealing with Insurance After an Accident

Drivers are taught to exchange information with other drivers when an accident occurs. But after a car accident, how should you deal with insurance companies? If you don’t know, that’s okay! You’re not alone. Traffic accidents are chaotic, and dealing with insurance companies can be confusing, even for the most experienced drivers. Take a moment to collect yourself after a traffic accident, document the scene, and then take out your cellphone. There will be a few phone calls you’ll want to make. What should you do if you’re not at-fault for an accident? Typically, if someone hits you with their vehicle, you’ll want to call your own insurance company and avoid speaking to the other person’s insurance company, whenever possible. Of course, it’s never as simple as all that. Here are a few steps that can make the process of handling insurance companies easier. Call the police: Ask police officers to come down to the accident scene. You will especially want to do this if you’re not at-fault for an accident. Call your insurance company: When someone hits your car, you should call your own insurance company. Tell them that there’s been an accident. Be prepared to give your insurance company information: Once you have contacted your insurance adjuster, provide them with the information you received from the other driver(s) involved, which police department handled your case; and the location, time, and date of an accident. Do not contact the other driver’s insurance company: Wait until you have spoken to a lawyer about your case before speaking to the other driver’s insurance company. Dealing with insurance can be stressful, but by speaking to the right people and avoiding others, you can set up a strong foundation for your personal injury case. Reasons some people don’t report accidents Some people may be worried about reporting an accident to their adjuster out of fear that their premiums will go up. It is unlikely your rates will increase after a collision if you’re not the at fault party. Insurance companies use many different factors to determine whether or not your rates will increase. Adjusters take into account the severity of your accident, such as your driving history, whether you’re the at-fault party, and the value you have to your insurance company.1 Others may be worried about this accident showing up on their record. Calling an officer to the scene can help prevent this. Every accident reported to the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) will show up on your record, unless an officer’s report says you were not the at-fault motorist. Although this is not a guarantee, it can help. By not calling an officer, you risk the chance of an accident staying on your record anywhere from three to five years. How should you handle the other driver’s insurance adjuster? After an accident, the other party’s insurance company will most likely attempt to contact you. You don’t have to speak to them! In fact, it is better not to talk to the other driver’s adjuster when you have been injured in a collision, period. Instead, you should find a car accident lawyer to handle you claim. Your lawyer and your insurance adjuster should do the talking for you. This is for your own protection because insurance adjusters are trained to use manipulation and other tricks to fish out information in an attempt to hurt your claim and the amount of compensation your case may be worth. On the off chance you do need to speak to the other driver’s adjuster, you must be careful. Keep the following in mind so you’re not tricked into giving out too much information: Do not discuss what condition you may be in. An adjuster may ask you how you’re doing, pretending they care about your well-being. In reality, they’re trying to find information that may point to your injuries not being as serious as you claim. Anything you say can be used against you. This is why you should never offer up any additional information that could be potentially construed in their favor. Never agree when they ask if they can record your conversation. Recordings of your conversations can be used as evidence against you! California is a “two-party” state, meaning both parties must agree to be recorded.2 An adjuster cannot legally record you if you say no. Avoid speculating. If you don’t know the answer to a question, say you don’t know. Never attempt to guess an answer.3 If the other company’s adjuster calls you, ask if you can have your own adjuster on the line with you or send them your adjuster’s or lawyer’s information so they can contact them. Remember: the goal is to never speak to the other company’s adjuster, if possible. Dealing with insurance can be stressful, but you don’t have to go through it alone. Our car accident lawyer from Wilshire Law Firm will fight the other driver’s insurance company on your behalf so you can receive the maximum compensation for your claim possible. Contact us today and schedule your free consultation at 1-800-522-7274. Disclaimer: The information provided is not meant to serve as legal advice, nor does it constitute a guarantee or prediction regarding the outcome of your legal matter. Sources: The Department of Motor Vehicles, “How Auto Claims Affect Auto Insurance Rates,” https://www.dmv.org/insurance/how-auto-claims-affect-auto-insurance-rates.php Digital Media Law Project, “California Recording Law,” http://www.dmlp.org/legal-guide/california-recording-law Nolo, “Insurance Adjusters: First Discussions,” https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/insurance-adjusters-first-discussions-29752.html

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