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Minimum Wage Raised in LA County, But Not For Everyone

California and Los Angeles County’s Minimum Wage Inches Closer to $15.00 per Hour Although the California minimum wage is now $12.00 per hour for large employers and $11.00 per hour for small employers, that hasn’t stopped many counties and municipalities across the state from increasing their minimum wages. Starting July 1st, 2019, workers in the City of Los Angeles and Unincorporated Los Angeles County received [a small bump in pay](https://abc7.com/society/cities-across-la-county-see-new-minimum-wage-increase/5375233/) as part of the county’s plan to raise the minimum wage to $15.00 per hour by 2021. What are LA County’s New Minimum Wage Laws? Cities all throughout California have varying wage and hour laws—in fact, California has some of the most complicated minimum wage laws in the country. The actual minimum wage paid out depends on a few things, namely: the location, the employer’s size, and the employee’s line of work. In Unincorporated LA County, the new minimum wage laws are as follows: Employers with fewer than 26 employees must pay at least $13.25 per hour. If an employer has 26 or more employees, they are now required to pay at least $14.25 per hour. Both figures represent a $1.00 per hour increase over the previous minimum wage. Although the City of Los Angeles raised its minimum wage in accordance with Los Angeles County, special provisions have been granted to hotel workers within the City of Los Angeles. Wages for hotel employees made a small jump from their previous rate of $16.10 per hour to $16.63 per hour. Where Else Has The Minimum Wage Changed? These developments are not unique to LA—localities stretching from San Francisco to Santa Monica are pushing their minimum wages higher in-step with Los Angeles. But cities like Long Beach and Torrance are failing to keep pace, refusing to raise their minimum wage above the state-required levels. For a complete list of all recent minimum wage changes in California, The National Law Review has compiled a complete list of changes throughout the state.

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Rental Car Insurance: Everything You Need to Know

A car accident may be the furthest thing from your mind when you’re researching rental cars. But the rental car agent will most certainly bring it up when you pick up your vehicle. That’s because they’ll offer you additional insurance coverage. Do you know what coverage to accept and what to turn down? It’s so important to research and find out what your own insurance and credit card cover way before you reach the rental car counter. Otherwise, if you do get into a car accident with your rental, you could be looking at some major problems. Keep in mind, this information applies only to passenger vehicles rented in the United States from traditional car rental companies. If you are renting a car for business purposes, odds are that your personal auto insurance will not cover your rental. First, let’s look at the five most common rental car company coverage choices: Loss/Collision Damage Waiver – The rental car company won’t charge you if the vehicle is damaged or stolen. This also covers what’s deemed “loss of use charges” if the car has to go into a shop to be repaired, causing it to be out of the rental car company’s fleet for any period of time. Liability Coverage – Protects you if you injure someone or damage property due to a car accident. Personal Accident Insurance – Covers medical bills for the driver and any passengers in the rental vehicle. Sometimes ambulance expenses are covered as well. Personal Effects Coverage – Coverage for personal belongings stolen or damaged while in the rental. Roadside Assistance – Most rental car companies offer roadside assistance– at a fee. This protects you from additional charges for problems that may arise, such as running out of gas, lost keys or a dead battery. Note, flat tire services are not always covered or may only be offered separately, adding on yet another fee. Rental car agents often employ scare tactics when they offer you additional insurance coverage. That’s because they’re not service employees, they’re salespeople. You might be surprised to learn that they make commissions on every extra they can tack onto to your rental car bill, hence the hard sell. It’s so important to research and find out what your own insurance and credit card cover way before you reach the rental car counter. Are any of the car rental company’s added coverages worth buying? A lot will depend on your individual circumstances. You certainly don’t want to waste money and pay for the same coverage twice, but you don’t want to be on the hook for thousands of dollars in bills either. There are some situations where the choice is more obvious. YES: You currently don’t have car insurance – You must have some sort of insurance before you get behind the wheel. If you have homeowner’s, renter’s or health insurance, check to see if and what rental car coverage they offer. If they don’t cover your rental, check with your credit card company. If they only offer secondary coverage, which is more common, you’ll need to take at least part of the rental car company’s coverage. See below for an explanation of what your credit card will cover. You’re not confident behind the wheel or driving in a new city – If you’re nervous about driving in a new city and/or a new, unfamiliar vehicle, you may want to add their collision coverage for added peace of mind. MAYBE: Your own auto insurance policy has a high deductible and/or minimum liability coverage – If you only carry your state’s minimum in coverage and you’re involved in a major accident, your policy may not cover all of the damages. You’ll have to pay the difference. That can run into the tens of thousands of dollars. You may also have to pay a large deductible. You have homeowner’s or renter’s insurance that covers your personal belongings –Some consumers want to avoid filing a claim through their own insurance because they’re afraid their premiums will go up. If that’s your situation, go ahead and add personal effects coverage. It’s one of the lower priced add-ons so it doesn’t add much to your rental car bill anyway. Of course, check to see how much the daily charges add up to before you do. NO: You are covered by your own personal auto insurance – Consumers who are fully covered and have high liability limits on their personal insurance policies can usually decline any extra coverage from the car rental company. Your health insurance company offers personal accident insurance – You can probably decline this coverage. Check with your health insurance provider to make sure. Some rental car companies also offer wrongful death coverage. If you have life insurance, you may already have coverage. Some health insurance companies offer it as well. Check to see if that’s the case. You already have roadside assistance – If you have roadside assistance, either through an organization, your insurance or your credit card, you can waive this coverage. Double check with them to make sure they cover rental vehicles. For consumers who haven’t rented a car in a while, note that the days of free roadside assistance are pretty much gone. The majority of rental car companies now charge for the service and that can really add to your final bill. Won’t my credit card cover car rental insurance? That depends. First some requirements. In order to have any insurance coverage through your credit card, you must: Use that card to book your vehicle. The person behind the wheel at the time of the accident must match the name on the credit card used to book the reservation. You must decline collision coverage from the rental car company when you pick up your vehicle. If you can tick off all three of these, then it depends on whether your credit card offers primary or secondary coverage. Primary Coverage – If you have primary coverage, you’re covered in an accident. In fact, your auto insurance company will not be involved at all. The problem is that not too many credit cards offer primary coverage. Secondary Coverage – Most credit cards only offer secondary coverage. That means your personal auto insurance pays out on the claim first. It only kicks in after your own coverage has been exhausted. An example would be to reimburse you for any deductible paid. What can I do to avoid any surprises at the end of my rental? Inspect the vehicle at pick up – One of the most important things you can do at pick up is to inspect the car thoroughly with the agent present. Take your time doing this. Don’t be afraid to point out anything that looks like a scratch or a dent. Videotape or take photos as you inspect it. Don’t forget the interior as well. Sit inside the car. Lower and raise the windows and make sure everything else is in working order. Rushing things may cause you to overlook a scratch or dent. That can end up costing you hundreds of dollars when you return the car. Inspect it again when you drop it off – When you bring it back, videotape or photograph the vehicle again, especially if no rental agent is present. Ask questions – Don’t be shy. Ask questions regarding the actual rental paperwork. If there’s a fee you don’t understand, ask what it’s for. There are cheaper car rental insurance options out there. Through online booking services – If you rented your car through an online travel service, you can purchase additional coverage directly through their site. Most offer the same rental car insurance for considerably less than what the rental car companies charge. You need to add it at the time of booking. Third party car rental insurance providers – Another lower priced choice is car rental insurance through a third-party provider. Again, you’ll have to plan in advance. These policies are offered by several established insurance companies at up to 1/3 less than what the rental car companies are charging. What happens if I do get into an accident with my rental car? Getting into an accident with a rental car is a little more complicated than with your own car. There’s a third party involved: the car rental company. Here’s how they’re likely to proceed. The rental car company doesn’t really care who’s at fault. When you rent a vehicle, you promise to return it in the exact same condition it was in when you were handed the keys, whether you caused the accident or not. That is clearly spelled out in the paperwork you sign on the day that you pick up the vehicle. The state of their vehicle is their main concern. The rental car company will tap your insurance even if you didn’t cause the accident. The rental car company will want their vehicle back in circulation as soon as possible. They will go through the insurance you used when you booked your reservation to make sure they’re covered, whether you are at fault for the accident or not. As for any deductible, generally, you’ll have to pay that directly to the rental car company. Again, it doesn’t matter if you were at fault for the accident or not. They may charge a “loss of use” fee for each day the rental vehicle is in the shop being repaired. Depending on your insurance coverage, you could potentially be billed for rental charges while the vehicle is being repaired. This is called ‘loss of use”. If it takes a week to get the car fixed and back into the rental car company’s fleet, you might be on the hook for an additional week’s rent. If you have loss of use coverage, but the time the vehicle is in the shop exceeds the limits of your coverage, you’ll be billed for the difference. All that aside, you should consider contesting this controversial fee. Many consumers have successfully challenged it through their insurance companies. What about the other driver and you? If you are at fault – If you have complete personal coverage, your insurance will cover all expenses. However, your insurance rates could go up as well. If you are at fault but don’t have sufficient coverage, you will be liable for any property and personal damages due to the accident. The other party may also come after you for medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering. If you are not at fault – If you’re injured in a car accident, you should pursue legal action against the at-fault party to recoup any damages, deductibles, medical bills and lost wages incurred. It’s important to call a personal injury attorney as soon as possible after the accident. A good personal injury attorney will have experience dealing with accidents involving rental cars. You have the facts, now the final decision is yours. Deciding what coverage to accept and turn down is a highly personal one. For some, a $1,000 deductible is not a big deal, for others it absolutely is. Then there’s the question of how much liability you want to expose yourself to. That all depends on what you’re comfortable with. You might be the type of person who wants a stress-free rental and doesn’t mind spending extra for that. Or you may be willing to take a chance to save some money. The bottom line is: Know what your personal insurance and credit card cover before you reach the rental car counter. Hopefully, you’ll have an incident-free rental. But if you are injured in a car accident and were not at fault, you’ll want an experienced car accident attorney by your side. At Wilshire Law Firm we know the complexities that accidents involving a rental car can present. Our attorneys will fight to make sure you obtain a fair and just settlement. We have your best interests at heart and are ready to assist you every step of the way. Contact us today at 1-800-522-7274. For further reading and information, visit: DMV: When to buy rental car insurance Consumer Affairs: Car rental insurance tip sheet Department of Insurance: Things to know about car insurance and rental cars before starting your road trip

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Motorcycle Safety in All Types of Weather

May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. While that usually means warmer weather, the month kicked off with an uncharacteristically cool and gloomy day in Southern California. Of course, this being the Golden State warm sunny days are on the horizon, just in time for the weekend. Given this generally great weather, it’s no surprise to learn that California has the highest number of registered motorcycles in the country.[1] One would think that with all of those motorcycles, California motorists would be much more careful when sharing the road with them. That, unfortunately, is not always the case. That lack of awareness coupled with unexpectedly slick roads can lead to an uptick in motorcycle accidents. Here are some safe riding tips for different weather conditions: Riding Your Motorcycle In rain, wind, drizzle and fog: Slow down! Jokes about California drivers and rain aside, some rainy-day accidents are due to road conditions themselves. That’s because Southern California roads don’t receive much rain. When they do, all of that motor oil and other vehicles fluids come to the surface making for some very slick roadways. Roads are slickest when the rain first starts. If you can avoid going out on your motorcycle during the first hour of that rainfall, you should. If you’re out riding and heavy rain starts falling, there’s nothing wrong with taking cover. It’s always a good idea to slow down in the rain, no matter where you are, but it’s especially important in Southern California. But Don’t Go Too Slow Safety first, but common sense is important too. If you’re riding your motorcycle too slowly, impatient motorists can cause an accident attempting to pass you. Avoid Standing Water Because Southern California doesn’t get lots of rain, there’s a greater danger of flash flooding and its aftermath, standing water. Avoid standing water as much as possible and always look for higher ground. You don’t want to experience water anywhere near your engine and there can be deep, hidden potholes under that water as well. Don’t Tense Up in Windy Conditions Wind is unavoidable if you ride a motorcycle. What can be daunting to any rider, but more so to the novice, are heavy crosswinds. These are more common when crossing a bridge or on winding mountain roads. Many riders tense up and tighten their grips, which makes it harder to steer. Instead, stay loose and continually adjust your steering to continue forward in a straight line. But if wind conditions become too dangerous, again, take cover if you can. Riding Your Motorcycle in Warm or Hot Conditions: The beauty of living in California is that you can experience the beaches of Orange County in the morning then be out in Palm Springs in the afternoon. While that can be exhilarating, it’s important to make sure your bike and you make the transition from cool to hot smoothly. Tire Pressure and Baking Hot Asphalt Your tires should be inflated to the proper air pressure specifications. Road temperatures can easily soar into triple digits, even on a warm day. Baking hot asphalt and under-inflated tires can result in a blowout. The risk becomes greater if your motorcycle is heavier because of a passenger and/or any gear. Hot Weather Gear If you’re riding in the desert, don’t wear leather. Mesh textile clothing is the way to go. As tempting as it may be, don’t go sleeveless or wear shorts. Exposed skin can easily burn in the sun and wind. Also, if you get into an accident, you don’t want your bare skin making contact with the pavement. And don’t forget to cover or put sunscreen on the back of your neck! Many riders forget about this area with painful results. Ride with a Buddy A breakdown or accident in the desert can quickly become a dangerous situation. Ideally, don’t ride alone. If that’s unavoidable, make sure you carry extra hydration and some sort of covering. You could end up stranded in an area with no shade. Solo riders should also let those closest to them know their general trip itinerary. May all of your motorcycle riding be filled with beautiful sunny days. But if they’re not, be ready for it and stay safe! Sources: [1] worldatlas.com

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How often do motorcycles crash?

Approximately 236 motorcycle crashes result in injuries every day in the United States, with an average of about 86,000 total injuries from crashes per year (2011-2015). According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 88,000 motorcyclists were injured, with 4,976 reported deaths in 2015 alone. The amount of motorcycle accident injuries in the U.S. have also been on the rise, jumping from 52,000 in 1995, to a whopping 98,000 in 2007. The trend then tapered down to 77,000 in 2011, before drastically jumping back up to just under 90,000 in 2012, where it has plateaued. Motorcycle accident-related injuries have been on the rise in the U.S., possibly because there are millions of more motorcycles on the road, and perhaps, also due to the rise of “distracted drivers,” taking their hands off the wheel to use their cell phones. California motorcycle injury statistics California saw a decrease in motorcycle injuries during 2016, while the entire country saw an increase (+4,000). However, California, because of its vast population size (over 39,000,000), still had the second-most motorcycle injuries compared to every other state, except for Florida. In 2015, 27% of California motorcycle fatalities involved riders who did not have a valid motorcycle license. Furthermore, 42% of all motorcycle riders who were killed in a single-vehicle collision were alcohol-impaired. (The term “alcohol-impaired” defines motorcycle riders with blood alcohol concentrations of .08 grams per deciliter (g/dL) or higher.) Lack of preparation and lack of sobriety are just two factors that account for riders in California being 29 times more likely than passenger car occupants to die after suffering through an accident. The more we can avoid these inebriating factors, the better off we’ll be. Safe riding is fun riding With 881,386 registered motorcycles in California and an additional 34,509,961 registered vehicles, there’s a lot of room for motorcycle accidents to happen. You can do your part to prevent a motorcycle accident by using these tips to be a safer rider. 10 useful motorcycle safety tips: Wear safety gear, like state-compliant helmets, gloves, and reflective jackets. Stay in your comfort zone. Avoid unnecessary risks and showboating. Inspect your motorcycle often. Check for leaks, tire pressure, and body damage. Don’t rely on just your mirrors when switching lanes. Use your head! Aim long, and always err on the side of caution when approaching intersections. Avoid riding under stress. Don’t use your MC as a form of therapy. If you have a passenger, be 100% comfortable with the extra weight. Pay attention to the weather, and avoid riding in storms or rain showers. Acknowledge other riders. They have your back, remember that. Have fun! Motorcycles are amazing, so long as you’re safe. Enjoy the ride! No one likes to be told how to live their life – especially motorcyclists – but there’s no denying that riding sober, knowing your limits, and wearing the proper safety gear will significantly decrease your chances of injury. Most times, the other car is at fault Although you may ride responsibly, another motorist may not. In these cases, it’s not hard to prove that the driver was at fault in a passenger-vehicle crash. According to the famous 1981 Hurt Report, “In two-thirds of motorcycle accidents involving another vehicle, the driver of the other vehicle violated the motorcycle rider’s right of way and caused the accident.”* For instance, as cell phone usage has caused a dramatic rise in “distracted driving” (which is perhaps directly correlated to the increase in motorcycle injuries), many passenger car motorists think they can lie to the judge and say they weren’t on their phone at the time of the incident. All it takes is a subpoena to obtain phone records and you’re looking at one potentially hefty settlement. If something happens, you need to be prepared At Wilshire Law Firm, we represent riders who are involved in motorcycle accidents, every day. Almost 30% of our cases involve these types of accidents. We know all the complicated ins and outs of dealing with motorcycle-related crashes, and we truly understand the sensitivities involved with the aftermath of these, sometimes tragic, incidents. With all the factors that go into these types of extra-sensitive personal injury cases, it’s extremely important that your family relies on attorneys they can trust. If you have been in a motorcycle accident, or know someone who has, you may be entitled to a substantial settlement. Your first call should be 911, then, call Wilshire Law Firm at 1-800-522-7274. We strongly advise you to save our number in case of a future emergency. Our expert motorcycle accident lawyers can be reached 24/7, 365, and are ready to assist you every step of the way – helping to manage medical expenses, repairs, and, of course, dealing with insurance companies. Sources: **The Hurt Report *– Once considered the most important motorcycle safety report of the 20thcentury, this report has been argued to be invalid, due to the following changing factors in motorcycle riding: Motorcycle Engineering Changes User Population Changes Automobile Engineering Changes Roadway Environmental Changes Insurance Information Institute LA Times FindLaw DMV NHTSA

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Where Do Car Accidents Happen Most?

Car accidents are, by nature, unpredictable. There is no exact science to forecasting or preventing them. However, there are evident patterns in when and where crashes occur – and knowing these patterns can help reduce the risk of an incident. In this article, we cover a few common accident scenarios and what you can do in these situations to avoid becoming a statistic. Neighborhoods It may sound surprising, but the majority of car accidents happen close to home. In fact, a Progressive Insurance study from 2004 found that approximately 52% of all accidents occur within just five miles from a person’s home. Generally, we’re more likely to crash in our own neighborhoods than anywhere else. This can be explained by our brain’s propensity for going on autopilot when we’re driving familiar routes. If you’ve ever arrived at a destination only to realize that you were in a trance-like state the entire drive, then you know this phenomenon. When we drive in familiar places, we tend to rely more on muscle memory than on our vigilance and active driving skills (dulling our ability to react to unexpected occurrences). The two most important things you can and should do every time you drive is buckling up and stay alert. As long as you keep your mental faculties fully active, you will be a better, safer driver on the road. Parking Lots When you combine lots of cars in a compact space with stressed-out drivers all vying for limited parking spaces, you get a hotbed for accidents. Parking lots are arguably the place where most low-speed collisions occur. Common parking lot accidents include vehicles backing up into each other, vehicles backing up and getting clipped by passing vehicles, vehicles sideswiping other vehicles as they park, etc. While accidents at these sites very rarely result in significant injuries, the vehicle damages that often result can be expensive to repair. Daily Commutes In large sprawling metropolitan cities like Los Angeles, commuters spend hours each day stuck in traffic. Many commuters multitask behind the wheel, putting on makeup, fiddling with the radio, eating food, shaving, and even brushing their teeth. Additionally, people may feel physically exhausted or mentally frazzled from getting up early or from having a hard day at work. When you take all of these factors into consideration, it’s not hard to see why many crashes occur during rush hour. What should you do if you’ve been injured in a car accident? If you or a loved one has been injured in a car accident caused by another party, please don’t hesitate to contact the experienced car accident lawyers at Wilshire Law Firm for immediate legal assistance. We can help you get compensation for your medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and more. For a FREE comprehensive case evaluation, call us today at 1-800-52-CRASH.

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

Who we are

Wilshire Law Firm is an award-winning personal injury, employment, aviation, and class action law firm that has been serving clients for nearly 15 years. Our team of more than 200 professionals is ready to serve you!

Our Attorneys

Our experienced lawyers have received numerous prestigious awards and accolades for their legal excellence and dedicated client service. We even have attorneys who are named among the top 1% of lawyers nationwide.

Proven Results

Our law firm has helped thousands of clients, recovering more than $850 million in verdicts and settlements on their behalf. We have a reputation for winning even the most difficult and complex cases!

Who We Are

The Saadian Law Firm is an award-winning personal injury, employment, aviation, and class action law firm that has been serving clients for nearly 15 years. Our team of more than 200 professionals is ready to serve you!

Our Attorneys

Our experienced lawyers have received numerous prestigious awards and accolades for their legal excellence and dedicated client service. We even have attorneys who are named among the top 1% of lawyers nationwide.

Proven Results

Our law firm has helped thousands of clients, recovering more than $850 million in verdicts and settlements on their behalf. We have a reputation for winning even the most difficult and complex cases!